How Healthy Really is Healthy?

Breakfast biscuits

That’s right, they’re biscuits … but for breakfast? Like the bikkies you soak in a cup of tea, these brand-new ‘breakfast’ biscuit varieties are high in sugar and/or hydrogenated fat and don’t produce a wholesome start to the day, leaving you feeling hungry and disappointed. My biggest issue with these types of cereals is how good are they for or kids with conditions such as autism spectrum disorder¬† or cancers? The major consnsus on the subject from what I have been able to gather is that sugars are ok but in moderation. (Here is a list of foods that should be avoided for ASD kids)

‘Natural’ sweeteners such as agave syrup, rice malt syrup or coconut sugar

Sugar is sugar is sugar. Whether it’s from sugar cane or another crop, excessive sugar can lead to weight gain and tooth decay. Pay specific focus on packaged foods and drinks, and foods purchased from coffee shops, takeaway stores and restaurants – they frequently include more sugar than you realize. Make sure you also pay attention to the display furniture of the products for warnings and health information before purchasing.

Healthy hamburgers

With more kilo-joules than a Big Mac, a few of the ‘healthy’ or ‘low-carb’ hamburgers out there could be contributing to your waistline when you’re attempting to get back on the healthy bandwagon. In fact, the so-called ‘healthy’ buns offered at one popular chain burger outlet include two times as much saturated fat as the standard bun alternative! Request for kilo-joule details in store and compare on your own.

Vegie chips

Also known as ‘chips’, vegie chips are just deep fried carrot, beetroot or sweet potato. Just like routine potato chips, they are still extremely high in salt and fat.

Banana bread or fruit muffins

They taste warm and buttery due to the fact that they are warm and buttery. Although they include banana or a token blueberry, banana bread and fruit-flavored muffins are generally absolutely nothing more than glorified cakes. They frequently come in big part sizes, too. If you’re going to consume a muffin or some banana bread, go halves with a good friend, or better yet make your very own healthy variation utilizing among the many muffin recipes or banana and blueberry bread recipes at livelighter.com.au

‘Healthy’ flavored waters such as vitamin waters, mineral waters or nutrient waters or sports beverages

With approximately 7 teaspoons of sugar per 500ml bottle, these are essentially classy cordial. Skip the unneeded kilo-joules and choose water rather, or instill with fruit or mint for a refreshing twist. And unless you’re an elite professional athlete you would be much better drinking water rather than electrolyte replacement sports beverages, which are usually loaded with sugar.

‘Healthy’ beer

You know the saying, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is? Apply that theory to beer which declares to be sugar-free, low-carb, natural, organic or anything else that makes it sound great for you. While low-carb beers might be lower in carbohydrates than routine beers, they’re not always a healthier choice. The alcohol and kilo-joule content is commonly really similar to basic beer. Our advice? Think about light beer– the energy you’ll conserve by minimizing alcohol outweighs any benefit a ‘low-carb’ beverage can provide. ‘

Snack bars

They may appear healthy, but in reality most bars– be it muesli, cereal, fruit or nut– are comprised of about one-third sugar and pack in more energy than you ‘d anticipate from a ‘healthy’ snack.

Flavored or low-fat yogurts

Flavored yogurts and reduced-fat yogurts are frequently high in fat and sugar. Inspect the nutrition panel and ingredients list for added sugar and high fat material. Pick yogurts that contain no greater than 15g of sugar and 2g fat per 100g. Frozen yogurt can also be a sugar trap especially when fruit syrups, lollies and chocolate are contributed to the top.

‘Natural’ lollies

It’s all in the title. Notice that a lot of confectionery using the word ‘natural’ integrates it as part of the brand or tagline, so it’s not based on their nutritional content. ‘Natural’ lollies, whether made from fruit concentrate, honey or regular sugar are still high in sugar and do not offer other dietary value.

The bottom line is this: unless you are on a fitness model diet, most things in moderation are ok. However, keep in mind that a lot of pre packaged and processed foods have hidden ingredients that you would not be aware of so always read the packet labels before consuming.